Use of Mobile Phones to Dispatch Volunteers to Perform Early CPR, the First 303 Cases.



David Fredman* David Fredman*, Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Science and Education, Södersjukhuset and Section of Cardiology, Södersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden, Stockholm, Sweden
Tomas Stark, LEKAB communication Systems, Stockholm, Sweden
Jacob Hollenberg, Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Science and Education, Södersjukhuset and Section of Cardiology, Södersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden, Stockholm, Sweden
Per Nordberg, Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Science and Education, Södersjukhuset and Section of Cardiology, Södersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden, stockhom, Sweden
Leif Svensson, Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Science and Education, Södersjukhuset and Section of Cardiology, Södersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden, Stockholm, Sweden
Mårten Rosenqvist, Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Science and Education, Södersjukhuset and Section of Cardiology, Södersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden, Stockholm, Sweden
Mattias Ringh, Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Science and Education, Södersjukhuset and Section of Cardiology, Södersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden, Stockholm, Sweden


Track: Research
Presentation Topic: Public (e-)health, population health technologies, surveillance
Presentation Type: Oral presentation
Submission Type: Single Presentation

Building: Joseph B. Martin Conference Center at Harvard Medical School
Room: B-Bray Room
Date: 2012-09-16 02:45 PM – 03:30 PM
Last modified: 2012-09-10
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Abstract


Background: A cardiac arrest is a race against time where every minute counts. In Sweden approximately 2 million people have skills in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and nowadays almost everyone carries a mobile phone.
Objective: To evaluate a new concept where a Mobile positioning system (MPS) is used to locate and dispatch lay responders trained in CPR to nearby out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) victims.
Methods: A mobile phone service using MPS was developed and volunteers trained in CPR were recruited and connected to it. The MPS is called Mobile Life Saver (MLS). The MLS was activated via the dispatch centre simultaneously with ambulance dispatch on suspicion of an OHCA. The volunteers were dispatched to the suspected OHCA using a text message and a computer generated phone call but only if they were positioned within 500 m from the suspected OHCA.
Results: Over 82 weeks the MLS was triggered by the dispatch centre in 303 cases upon suspicion of OHCA.
36% (n=109) of these suspected OHCA cases were later categorized as true cardiac arrests and resuscitation (CPR) was attempted.
In 44 % of these true OHCAs (n=48) one or more volunteers reached the location prior to ambulance arrival and in 42 % of these cases (n=20) bystander CPR was performed by one or more volunteer.
Conclusion: Mobile phone technology can be used to locate and dispatch CPR-trained lay responders to reach nearby out-of -hospital cardiac arrests and to perform early bystander CPR prior to ambulance arrival. However, the potential survival effect of these findings needs to be thoroughly evaluated in a randomized trial.




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